Maryknoll Affiliates

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The Maryknoll Affiliates are connected to a wider movement that is popularly called “Maryknoll.” Maryknoll is comprised of three distinct entities: the Maryknoll  Fathers and Brothers (officially known as the Catholic Foreign Mission Society of America), the Maryknoll Sisters of St. Dominic and the Maryknoll Lay Missioners... 

Mission Statement

Maryknoll Affiliates, while continuing to pursue their own life's journey, commit themselves to the mission goals of Maryknoll in the context of Chapters that gather for prayer, reflection and action. Maryknoll Affiliates challenge one another to witness to mission as a way of life by going beyond borders, locally and globally, walking with the poor and excluded, and striving for peace and justice for all of God's creation.

Four Pillars of the Maryknoll Affiliates

Four Pillars of the Maryknoll Affiliates

Maryknoll Affiliates, as inividuals and in their "Mission Communities" try to live out the Four Pillars of the Maryknoll Affiliates: Spirituality, Global Vision, Community and Action.

Featured News

Sign Letter to Obama Regarding Torture

This week, the ninth anniversary of the opening of the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, hundreds of activists are participating in efforts to raise awareness of and end the use of torture by the United States. Witness Against TortureAmnesty International and the Center for Constitutional Rights have prepared the letter excerpted below which urges President Obama to close the detention center and to give the detainees a fair trial. Organizations and individuals are encouraged to sign on. Click here to add your signature.

At the start of his administration, President Obama signed an executive order mandating the closure of the detention camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba within a year. Yet the prison remains open, and on January 11, 2011 it enters its tenth year of operation. Failing to fulfill the executive order, the Obama administration has also extended some of the worst aspects of the Guantánamo system by continuing indefinite detentions without charge or trial, employing illegitimate military commissions to try some suspects, and blocking accountability for torture both by refusing to conduct independent and thorough investigations and by attempting to prevent the courts from reviewing lawsuits brought by formerly detained men.

As human rights organizations and people of conscience, we are calling for the closure of Guantánamo and both transparency at all U.S.-run detention sites and accountability for the abuses that happen within them. We oppose secret detention sites, including so-called “filtration” or “screening” sites like the covert “black prison” at Bagram, where even the International Committee of the Red Cross has been denied access and where abusive interrogations are allegedly taking place. We also express our opposition to excessively punitive conditions of confinement in prisons and detention centers inside the United States, and note that prolonged solitary confinement is a form of torture prohibited under international standards for human rights. We reject the continuation of illegal and abusive Bush-era detention and interrogation policies by the Obama administration.

The story of Guantánamo remains the shameful case of the U.S. government rounding up nearly 800 men and boys, indiscriminately labeling them “the worst of the worst,” and throwing them into an island prison designed to exist beyond the reaches of the law, where they would have no right to challenge their detention or abuse. The vast majority of the prisoners at Guantánamo should never have been detained in the first place. Many were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time and were fleeing the chaos of war when U.S. forces entered Afghanistan. Only one in twenty was captured by the U.S. military. Most were captured by local civilians and authorities in Afghanistan and Pakistan and sold to the United States in exchange for substantial bounty. According to Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, a senior State Department official who served in the Bush administration between 2002-2005, the Bush administration knew early on that the majority of the men at Guantánamo were innocent but did not release them due to political concerns that doing so could harm support for the government’s push for war in Iraq and the broader “Global War on Terror.”

It is now clear that the Obama administration has no plans to close Guantánamo anytime soon, while opposition from Congress makes that goal even more remote. The prison at Guantánamo continues to exist in violation of both ethical and legal standards, and at risk to our collective safety. President Obama must act decisively or risk making Guantánamo and the Bush detention regime permanent features of the U.S. landscape.

Read the rest of the letter on the Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns website.
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